Coalition Wars – Austerlitz 2005 http://austerlitz2005.com/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 04:06:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://austerlitz2005.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-7-150x150.png Coalition Wars – Austerlitz 2005 http://austerlitz2005.com/ 32 32 Protesters on Parliament Hill urge a stop on jet fighter purchases https://austerlitz2005.com/protesters-on-parliament-hill-urge-a-stop-on-jet-fighter-purchases/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 02:05:12 +0000 https://austerlitz2005.com/protesters-on-parliament-hill-urge-a-stop-on-jet-fighter-purchases/ Links to the breadcrumb trail Local news “Canada shouldn’t spend billions of dollars on climate-damaging jet fighter jets.” Author of the article: Employee reporter The protest in front of Parliament Hill on Monday called on the federal government to cancel their purchase of 88 fighter jets. Photo by Jean Levac /Mail media Article content A […]]]>

“Canada shouldn’t spend billions of dollars on climate-damaging jet fighter jets.”

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A protest outside Parliament Hill on Monday was one of many held across Canada this week to call on the federal government to cancel its purchase of 88 fighter jets at a cost of $ 19 billion.

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“Canada shouldn’t spend tens of billions of dollars on climate-damaging jet fighter jets to be used in NATO wars,” said Bianca Mugyenyi, director of the Canadian Foreign Policy Institute, in a press release. “The extreme weather in British Columbia shows that these resources should be used to contain the climate crisis.”

The three aerospace companies applying for the fighter jet program have been informed in writing by the federal government that a decision will be made this month on a “downselect” of companies that are allowed to advance into the final phase of the competition.

The award for the project is expected to be announced in March or April 2022.

However, Public Services and Procurement Canada has remained silent about whether this schedule will be met. In a response to that newspaper earlier this month, the department simply said, “Canada continues to work towards a 2022 contract award.”

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The protest in front of Parliament Hill on Monday called on the federal government to cancel their purchase of 88 fighter jets.
The protest in front of Parliament Hill on Monday called on the federal government to cancel their purchase of 88 fighter jets. Photo by Jean Levac /Mail media

The new fighter jets, which are to replace the existing CF-18 aircraft operated by the Royal Canadian Air Force, would have an estimated life cycle cost of $ 77 billion.

“We want the federal government to invest in health care, affordable housing, green jobs and just recreation,” said Tamara Lorincz, a member of the Canadian Voice of Women for Peace, in a press release on the rallies. “Fighter jets are for violence, we need global cooperation to cope with the pandemic and the climate emergency.”

The “Action Week” was organized by the No Fighter Jets Coalition. Rallies should be held in Toronto, Vancouver, Victoria, Kingston, Nanaimo, BC, Hamilton, Regina, Halifax, Edmundston, NB, Collingwood, Edmonton, Montréal, and Ottawa.

– With files by David Pugliese


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2021 Lebanon is not 1989 Lebanon https://austerlitz2005.com/2021-lebanon-is-not-1989-lebanon/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 10:20:05 +0000 https://austerlitz2005.com/2021-lebanon-is-not-1989-lebanon/ In search of a way out that would improve the current situation of residents, many Lebanese people have tended to compare their bitter reality to what they went through in the 1980s. Few of them are “optimistic” about the prospect of an end to the disastrous situation like it was then. However, given the massive […]]]>

In search of a way out that would improve the current situation of residents, many Lebanese people have tended to compare their bitter reality to what they went through in the 1980s. Few of them are “optimistic” about the prospect of an end to the disastrous situation like it was then. However, given the massive differences between the two nodes, the tendency is to rule out this comparison.

It is true that there was an economic collapse in the 1980s that hit the local currency particularly hard. The State Treaty and its authority also declined, and the army continued to fragment, a process that began in the 1970s. What had been established during the “Two Years’ War” (1975-1976) was crowned early in the following decade with the thundering Israeli invasion of 1982 that preceded the outbreak of wars in the mountains, the southern suburbs, Beirut and Tripoli. followed by the war between the Shiites and the Palestinians, the “war of the camps” and the intra-Christian and intra-Shiite wars …

It is also true, however, that the damage that the country’s educational, financial, health and service institutions suffered at the time was not minor, but cannot be compared with the damage that is threatened with total closure today. Is it necessary to take up what happened in the port of Beirut or to give an overview of the situation of banks, universities, hospitals and other institutions?

In addition, perspectives seemed to emerge in the 1980s: Regardless of one’s own position on [Rafik] Hariri and his reconstruction and development policies, the fact remains that he drowned the market with money he invested and borrowed and created an immense number of projects and employment opportunities, at least in the capital. A similar perspective does not seem in sight today, just as little as a regional and international consensus on “saving Lebanon”, such as that which arose around Hariri. Our Arab neighbors and the West, with small exceptions, do not seem concerned about Hezbollah’s hegemonic position.

In addition, “Hariri’s Remedy” was accompanied by the return of new Lebanese capitalists who wanted to become politicians and who had made their fortune abroad during the war. Added to this was the influx of young people who had studied abroad and were waiting for an opportunity to return to Lebanon and work there.

None of this applies to today.

For its part, the regional situation has also changed drastically. The resolution of the Lebanese civil war, which was framed by the 1989 Taif Accords, stood in the broader context of US-Syrian rapprochement along with Syria’s participation in the war to liberate Kuwait. Then, less than two years after the Taif Accords, the Madrid Peace Conference took place, in which Syria also took part. Only two years later, in 1993, the Palestinian-Israeli Oslo Accords, for which many hopes were tied, was signed. In 1994, the Wadi Araba Treaty between Jordan and Israel added to the apparent climate in which breakthroughs were made across the region.

All of this is now part of a dead and buried past. Lebanon, through the mediation of Hezbollah, is linked to regional tensions that could break out at any time into a confrontation between Iran and Israel, which, if it should break out, has the ability to destroy whatever remains of the land. There is no side, domestic or foreign, that can control, undermine, or contain this disastrous link.

The entire regime is confronted with worrying existential scenarios. Lebanon, seen through this lens, is nothing more than part of a depressing portrait that includes Syria, Iraq and Palestine.

Added to the reasons for today’s pessimism is the collapse of the October Revolution. The fact that the main reason for its collapse was because Hezbollah prevented Shiites from getting involved brings us to this bitter truth: maintaining the existing worn-out system is difficult, but it is infinitely more difficult to change .

Meanwhile, sectarian feelings that hate each other grew fueled by all the perseverance and determination at their disposal. Even within the “ruling coalition” it seems to be a tedious task to establish any form of cross-sectarian orientation: On the other hand, it is sufficient to remind that the Rafik Hariri-Hezbollah settlement or the so-called “reconstruction” -resistance duo “made it possible it was such an alignment to survive from 1989 to 2005 when Hariri was removed from the picture.

Another problem is that the current crisis has not yet taken its final shape. With regard to the economic future, living conditions and security situation, the worst is always expected, a deterioration accelerated by the potential for an Iranian-Israeli war.

The proposed remedial actions, from the IMF and international organizations to the general election, appear to be stalling and crippling. You take one step forward before you take two steps backwards. As for crises, be they economic, political or social, they are increasing day by day.

Time and its teachings also play a role, of course. That is, the failure of the first experience creates a sense of desperation in those who think of trying again, although many of the obstacles observed during the second era arose from the way in which the the former were resolved.

The year 2021 is different from 1989, which brought us years of cold peace. Patchwork is the best-case scenario today, patchwork that has to be inspected and revised every hour.


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Ohio Republicans tie in with Trump’s rhetoric as they battle for the Senate seat https://austerlitz2005.com/ohio-republicans-tie-in-with-trumps-rhetoric-as-they-battle-for-the-senate-seat/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 23:00:00 +0000 https://austerlitz2005.com/ohio-republicans-tie-in-with-trumps-rhetoric-as-they-battle-for-the-senate-seat/ The field of more than a dozen candidates includes former Ohio State Treasurer Josh Mandel, former Republican Party chair Jane Timken, businessman Bernie Moreno, Senator Matt Dolan, businessman Mike Gibbons, and JD Vance, author of the New York Times bestselling book. Backwoods Elegy. “Trump has not yet supported anyone in the race. A desire to […]]]>
The field of more than a dozen candidates includes former Ohio State Treasurer Josh Mandel, former Republican Party chair Jane Timken, businessman Bernie Moreno, Senator Matt Dolan, businessman Mike Gibbons, and JD Vance, author of the New York Times bestselling book. Backwoods Elegy. “Trump has not yet supported anyone in the race.

A desire to stand out while they worked to be viewed as the most Trump-like was shown on a candidate forum this week.

There six of the candidates beat the Democrat-led suffrage bill, For the People Act and vaccine mandates and reiterated their strong support for Trump – with some repeating the lie that the 2020 elections were “rigged” and “stolen”.

The most famous of the candidates, Vance, blatantly lied in 2020, claiming the tech industry worked with the Democrats to rig the election.

“That is why we have the disaster that we are having instead of a second term from Donald Trump,” he said.

Mandel made similar claims.

“Every time they try to cancel me, I say it louder and louder. So let me be very, very clear: I think this election was stolen from Donald J. Trump,” he said.

Wanting to reassure the crowd that he also believed the election was stolen, Moreno challenged Mandel’s claim that the former treasurer is the only one in the race to consistently make the false claim.

“I’ve said that every time. Maybe you came too late and didn’t hear me, ”Moreno said to Mandel.

Trump won Ohio in both 2016 and 2020, and his support could be vital in the competitive primary.

“The president is rightly popular in Ohio. He’s done some great things for Ohio. He’s done some great things for the country, so of course we applaud his support, just as the Democrats applaud the support of Joe Biden and Hillary Clinton and “Barack Obama’s support,” Moreno told CNN.

Vance – once a Trump critic who wrote in a now-deleted tweet that Trump was “reprehensible” – is now emphatically praising the former president.

A native of Middletown, he views cultural conflict intensely as the road to victory for Republicans across the country.

“I think Republican officials have long worried that the Culture Wars are their election enemy, or at least a weakness for them, and yet it turns out that many of our voters are voting on things like whether their children will be indoctrinated.” in schools or whether their children are being told that there are 40 or 50 or 80 genders, “Vance told far-right media company Breitbart News earlier this month.

Vance declined CNN’s interview requests.

Shannon Burns, who heads the Republican Party in Strongsville, said he was suspicious of Vance’s repentance.

“I’m suspicious. I think everyone should be suspicious. You will hear in his own words what he said about President Trump in a way that was not politically driven. He was clearly a self-proclaimed Never Trumper,” he said.

Burns credits Trump for transforming the GOP in Buckeye State.

“He did something for the Republican Party in Ohio that no other candidate could ever do. “Said Burns.

Timken suggested that she work to build a coalition that includes both Trump loyalists and non-Trump Republicans.

“I am the candidate who can form a victorious coalition of Trump supporters and educated parents and bring those suburban voters back … to not only win a primary but also the general election,” Timken said in an interview at her campaign office in Columbus on Tuesday.

Her office contains a picture of her with Trump and a large cartoon banner with the 45th President on a military-style tank surrounded by fireworks and the American flag.

Timken said that inflation and the economy are most important to Ohio voters. She took a subtle look at her rivals’ more fiery tactics:

“You can’t win a race on Twitter in Ohio. So in Ohio you don’t win this race. “

Dolan is the only Republican candidate not seeking Trump’s support. He doesn’t criticize the former president, but says the race should be tightly focused on politics.

“President Trump won’t vote in May 2022; Ohio Republicans will vote. And if you look at what I could do, my conservative results here in the state Senate … to see that these are good Republican ideals are helping Ohio grow, “Dolan told CNN.


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In the new revolt in Sudan, women and youth will settle for nothing less than full civil rule https://austerlitz2005.com/in-the-new-revolt-in-sudan-women-and-youth-will-settle-for-nothing-less-than-full-civil-rule/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 08:06:43 +0000 https://austerlitz2005.com/in-the-new-revolt-in-sudan-women-and-youth-will-settle-for-nothing-less-than-full-civil-rule/ This language has been widely spoken by the younger generation over the past decade and has been used as a tool to resist the oppression of the former regime by students and artists. During the 2019 revolution, it was used to convey coded messages to young protesters. This widespread adoption of the language of marginalized […]]]>

This language has been widely spoken by the younger generation over the past decade and has been used as a tool to resist the oppression of the former regime by students and artists. During the 2019 revolution, it was used to convey coded messages to young protesters. This widespread adoption of the language of marginalized homeless people affected by the war has given rare recognition to parts of the Sudanese population who are ordinarily forgotten. It was also a sign of a deep desire for fundamental change in the country.

Another revolution

Protesters today are not calling for a return to the pre-October 25 situation. Women’s and youth groups, as well as resistance committees, seek more fundamental changes. They are ready for a new revolution if necessary to avoid another coup in the future. Young people want a clear break with the country’s turbulent history and the failure of its powerful elite. This can only be achieved with full civil rule and an end to military interference in politics.

The road to such change is long and arduous. But it is important to recognize the legitimacy of these demands. In a country that was under military rule for six decades and experienced 50 years of civil war, genocide and division, there is only one radical change.

And because we’ve been through everything in Sudan, we know that compromise is not a solution.

The seven demands of the resistance committees of October 30th lay the foundation for the future political agenda in the short and long term.

The demands focus on the demilitarization of the state, the release of prisoners, ensuring accountability for the crimes of the coup plotters and the building of civil institutions such as parliament.

Most importantly, the protesters have made it clear that they will not negotiate, compromise or partner with the coup plotters. Some experts and diplomats consider these conditions to be unrealistic, but the demands are aimed at avoiding any possibility of legitimizing the coup plotters.

The Sudanese people have already made up their minds to defy the coup and there is no turning back. If the international community is truly committed to democracy, it must stand by the people of Sudan and support their demands.


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The Cop26 message? We trust big companies, not states, to solve the climate crisis | Adam Tooze https://austerlitz2005.com/the-cop26-message-we-trust-big-companies-not-states-to-solve-the-climate-crisis-adam-tooze/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 11:08:00 +0000 https://austerlitz2005.com/the-cop26-message-we-trust-big-companies-not-states-to-solve-the-climate-crisis-adam-tooze/ C.op26 did not deliver a major climate agreement. In truth, there was no reason to expect one. The drastic measures that could pave the way to climate stability in one fell swoop are politically or diplomatically unsustainable. Like climate collapse itself, this is a fact to be reckoned with, a fact not just about “politicians” […]]]>

C.op26 did not deliver a major climate agreement. In truth, there was no reason to expect one. The drastic measures that could pave the way to climate stability in one fell swoop are politically or diplomatically unsustainable. Like climate collapse itself, this is a fact to be reckoned with, a fact not just about “politicians” but about the policies of which we are all, whether they like it or not, a part. The step from the scientific recognition of a climate emergency to a social agreement on radical measures is still too big. All the negotiators at Cop26 could do was workaround.

In climate finance, the gap between what is needed and what is on the table is staggering. The talk at the conference was all about the annual $ 100 billion (£ 75 billion) promised by rich countries to poorer countries in 2009. The rich countries have now apologized for falling short. The new resolution provides for the difference to be settled by 2022 and then a new framework to be negotiated. It is symbolically important and of practical help. But as everyone knows, it falls ridiculously behind what is necessary. John Kerry, America’s chief negotiator, said so himself in a speech to the CBI. We don’t need billions, we need trillions. Somewhere between $ 2.6 trillion and $ 4.6 trillion annually in funding for low-income countries to ease the crisis and adapt to it. Those are numbers, Kerry continued, no government in the world will be able to keep up. Not America. Not China.

We should take the advice. There won’t be a big green Marshall Plan. Even Europe or Japan will not raise trillions in government money. The solution, if there is one, will not be for rich governments to shoulder the global burden on national balance sheets.

So how does Kerry propose to fill the gap? For him, the solution is private. Hence the excitement over the $ 130 trillion Mark Carney claims to have rallied in the Glasgow Financial Alliance for Net Zero, a coalition of banks, asset managers, pension and insurance funds.

Lending by this group will not be discounted. The trillion, Kerry insisted to his Glasgow audience, will make a decent return. But how will they then flow to low-income countries? Because if there was a reasonable chance of making a profit by wiring West Africa with solar power, the trillions would already be at work. Larry Fink of BlackRock, the world’s largest fund manager, has the answer. It can steer trillions into the energy transition in low-income countries if the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank “reduce” lending by absorbing the initial losses on projects in Africa, Latin America and Asia. Even more money will flow if there is a carbon price that gives clean energy a competitive advantage.

It is a clean solution, the same clean neoliberal solution that has been offered over and over again since the 1990s. The same solution that was not delivered.

The discussion about CO2 pricing evokes bitter memories of shock therapy in Eastern Europe and developing countries. BlackRock’s backstop idea is the logic of the 2008 bank bailouts expanded to the global level – socializing the risks, privatizing profits.

At this point, the promised trillions of private funds to combat the climate crisis turn out to be true utopians, neoliberal utopians. CO2 pricing – a fee that is levied on emissions – could be the favorite of economists. Ironically, the only place it could work is in Europe, where energy is already heavily taxed and the world’s most advanced welfare states can cushion the impact. China is experimenting with the largest carbon market yet. But as a global proposal, a single minimum price for CO2 isn’t a starter, especially in the US, whose economists invented the idea.

Neither will Congress or a European Parliament be voting for hundreds of billions of dollars to support BlackRock. Western states carried out rescue operations in 2008 and 2020. But these were desperate efforts faute de mieuxto save the status quo at home. And that was poisonous enough. On a global scale, it has zero political appeal.

The risk, however, is not that Cop26 will open the door to a gigantic neoliberal climate patchwork, but that we will instead remain trapped in our current impasse and head towards disaster.

Given this prospect, both the US and the EU appear to be less preoccupied with grand carbon pricing and blending plans than with a one-off approach. Four separate initiatives show the direction of travel.

The aluminum and steel deal announced by the EU and the US ends one of Trump’s more absurd trade wars and turns it into a process to agree on accounting rules for carbon. A high-tech trade zone for clean steel with tariffs on high-carbon imports from China, Russia and Ukraine seems conceivable. It is not a global carbon price, but a sectoral buyers’ club from rich countries.

While the final statement on coal was disappointing, the US is working with India to encourage the adoption of renewable energy. This includes a three-way partnership with the United Arab Emirates to provide technical assistance and funding to expedite the move away from coal. India is not the only emerging market with a coal problem.

One of the best news from Cop26 was the $ 8.5 billion multinational package.

In history, key to accelerating the pace of industrial change is to incentivize first movers – leading companies adopting new technologies, sending the message to their competitors: innovate or lag behind. The announcement in November by the First Movers Coalition, backed by the US and the World Economic Forum and involving companies like shipping giant Maersk and Cemex and Holcim, two of the world’s leading cement manufacturers, could unleash a race to the top and could unleash a significant move.

Finally, there is an agreement to reduce emissions of methane, the long-neglected but deadly greenhouse gas, by 30% by 2030. This will require a technological push in the entire oil and gas industry worldwide.

Green New Deal advocates have long been pushing for government-led industrial policy. The approach taken by Kerry and his team seems to follow a rather reserved, pragmatic script. As Danny Cullenward and David Victor write in their book “Making Climate Policy Work”, the key is to try to find coalitions of the willing instead of big controversial deals and drive change sector by sector and raise ambition through repeated rounds of negotiations.

Like the 2015 Paris Agreement, which first demonstrated this pragmatic approach in practice, the Kerry initiatives face two big questions. Will a series of ad hoc measures lead to an adequate overall solution? In addition, not every deal can be win-win. How are the tough compromises carried out? Whose interests are being taken care of? The answer of the pragmatists is that no general answer can be given beforehand. The proof of the pudding lies in the food. It’s not a great answer. But as Cop26 testifies, it may be the only realistic one.

If so, the climate movement should respond to keep up the pressure. Politically pragmatic ad hocery may be realistic, but the shrinking CO2 budget is beyond negotiation. With the status quo deeply rooted, the temptation to pursue conservative wishful thinking is pervasive. Somebody has to hammer the message home. The greatest risk is not to change.


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Veterans Day Special for Husband and Wife | news https://austerlitz2005.com/veterans-day-special-for-husband-and-wife-news/ https://austerlitz2005.com/veterans-day-special-for-husband-and-wife-news/#respond Fri, 12 Nov 2021 02:15:00 +0000 https://austerlitz2005.com/veterans-day-special-for-husband-and-wife-news/ Mike and Leslie Heshelman have served together for over 40 years. Both spent years in the National Guard, including extended periods of full-time service and overseas assignments. The reason for both was simple, a desire to serve the people. “There was a recruiter who was a friend of my father’s trying to get my brother […]]]>

Mike and Leslie Heshelman have served together for over 40 years. Both spent years in the National Guard, including extended periods of full-time service and overseas assignments. The reason for both was simple, a desire to serve the people.

“There was a recruiter who was a friend of my father’s trying to get my brother to join the National Guard,” Mike said. “When I got the chance, I joined in 1981 and started basic training in 1982. First it was about spending one weekend a month for 20 years and then retiring. When I got involved, it was more about giving back to the community and the people who needed help. We were called to do a lot of work on the dikes during the Elnora and Hazelton floods. For me it became an opportunity to leave my everyday life and do good to people. “

“I grew up in a family that learned to help others,” says Leslie Heshelman. “I wanted to be part of something bigger that could do more. The military was a way for me to do that. “

Leslie Heshelman’s military career came to an end almost before it even began.

“I’ve tried three times to join the National Guard,” she said. “The first two were turned away because of my eyesight. On the third attempt I was granted a waiver. “

Leslie joined in 1990 and almost from the moment she signed up for duty, the United States was at war.

“I was sent to New Jersey for primary care,” she said. “Almost the second we got off the plane, there was an announcement that the first Gulf War had begun.”

The beginning of the Gulf War marked a change in the way the US military operated and how the National Guard participated in the defense of the country.

Most units of the Guard have not been in active military service since World War II. But as the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan developed, the National Guard became part of the active armed forces. It ended up with both Mike and Leslie being sent overseas.

“We were activated in 2002 and dispatched to Iraq in 2003,” said Mike. “We were sent to Camp Atterbury for training. While we were there, we received orders to go to Iraq. We couldn’t go home and tell the family personally. And we knew that the area in which we were deployed was a hotspot. “

Mike and Leslie Heshelman were married in 1994 with children at the time of posting.

“It’s a lot easier to use than staying at home,” said Leslie.

“If you are the one deployed, you will be sent out for training,” added Mike. “You think about the mission and what to do. Your time is being consumed by what you are going to do with your device. When you are on the job, you have to deal with what lies ahead of you every day and work with the other members of your unit. “

Being the spouse left behind in the states became a struggle of its own.

“You’re trying to take care of everything at home,” said Leslie. “Sometimes you can’t and have to ask friends and family for help. The big thing is worry. You know your spouse is in Iraq and every time you hear about something, worry begins. It is much more difficult for the spouse at home. “

The couple tried to keep communication lines open during the missions. Often with phone calls that had to be adjusted due to the time difference between Indiana and Iraq.

“We set up a video conference one time and Leslie and the boys went to Bloomington to make the call,” said Mike. “My oldest son didn’t want to talk to me. He was angry that I had to go and wasn’t home. It made me think about what I was doing. “

Two years later it was Leslie who went overseas. She was a paralegal and worked for the Air Guard in Baghdad.

Mike had retired after 24 years with the Guard, had served 20 years of active service the year before and had just entered the Daviess County Sheriff’s Department.

“When you are deployed, the members of your unit become more than your friends, they become close like family,” said Leslie. “You lean on them and they lean on you.”

Leslie’s job in Baghdad was to accompany foreigners who were in the American zone.

“I met this one man who was in Saddam’s army,” said Leslie. “He had been shot twice and I asked him why he was continuing and he told me he could either serve in the army or be killed by Saddam. He said that when he saw coalition forces march in, he finally felt he could see a future for his children. That really stuck with me. “

Mike had a few distractions while Leslie was out on the job. As a recently hired deputy, he was on the cemetery shift. During this time he also completed his academy training.

“Back then, the academy helped me focus on something else,” he said. “That helped me keep my head clear. I also became part of a new family as a member of the Sheriff’s Department. Although I was older, they took me in without any problems. “

Both Mike and Leslie point out that they both enjoyed the sense of camaraderie they experienced in the military.

“These are people you get really close to,” said Leslie.

“We still speak to some of them from time to time,” added Mike.

Another thing that stayed out of their service time was the idea of ​​being part of something bigger.

“You learn to trust people that they are doing their job and you will do yours, and together it makes something bigger than you could alone,” said Mike. “I know when it was time to retire I was ready to leave the military, but I wasn’t ready to leave the people.”

“I have absolutely no regrets about my service,” said Leslie.

Just because the Heshelmans shed their military uniforms didn’t mean they’d shed their desire to serve and be part of something greater.

In addition to being part of the sheriff’s department, Mike was part of the Plainville Volunteer Fire Department, where he eventually became chief.

“I joined the fire department before I retired from the military,” he said. “It was another way to help and keep in touch with the community. It expanded the camaraderie. At the same time, I became part of the Indiana Guard Reserve as a volunteer. “

For Leslie, much of her post service focus has been working with veterans.

“I got involved with the VFW to help my fellow veterinarians,” said Leslie. “There are many programs out there to help veterans and the people they are supposed to help just don’t know them. So many of these vets have come home feeling alone. You are not and I want you to know that there is help. I also have a special place in my heart for vets from the Vietnam era. They are strong men and women who have been through a lot. “

Looking back on their service, both Mike and Leslie say the Middle East assignments were qualified highlights.

“I can tell you that my engagement has been the experience of my life,” said Leslie. “But nothing I want to repeat.”

“Amen to that,” added Mike.


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SGA rejects student loan termination letters to Biden, Harris – The Quinnipiac Chronicle https://austerlitz2005.com/sga-rejects-student-loan-termination-letters-to-biden-harris-the-quinnipiac-chronicle/ https://austerlitz2005.com/sga-rejects-student-loan-termination-letters-to-biden-harris-the-quinnipiac-chronicle/#respond Wed, 10 Nov 2021 04:11:04 +0000 https://austerlitz2005.com/sga-rejects-student-loan-termination-letters-to-biden-harris-the-quinnipiac-chronicle/ Quinnipiac University’s Student Government Association on October 27th voted not to endorse an open letter urging President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris to immediately cancel all federal student loan debt. SGA President Nick Ciampanelli said the letter was inherently only trying to solve the problem temporarily and that the organization did not stand […]]]>

Quinnipiac University’s Student Government Association on October 27th voted not to endorse an open letter urging President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris to immediately cancel all federal student loan debt.

SGA President Nick Ciampanelli said the letter was inherently only trying to solve the problem temporarily and that the organization did not stand for that.

Connor Lawless

“We are here to support current and future students at this university,” said Ciampanelli. “By taking action to temporarily resolve such a current problem, we will not cling to our own values.”

After the SGA voted to reject the motion, the Quinnipiac Democrats were released a statement and expressed disappointment by saying it is “an insult to low-income students who rely on credit” to come to Quinnipiac, as well as those graduating in debt.

Around 65% of Quinnipiac students received federal loans, according to U.S. Department of Education data. The average debt amount for a Quinnipiac student after graduation is between $ 19,500 and $ 27,000.

The association created A petition calls on the SGA to reconsider its decision. The petition had only 21 signatures at the time of publication. Paul Capuzzo, president of the QU Democrats, told The Chronicle he was disappointed with the SGA’s decision.

“It felt like a slap in the face,” said Capuzzo.

Given the SGA’s argument that it would only fix immediate problems, Capuzzo said by not signing the letter, it shows that the SGA is unwilling to “walk and chew gum at the same time”.

“You should be ready to solve the immediate problem, put a band-aid on it and then solve the problem later,” said Capuzzo.

You should be ready to solve the immediate problem, put a band-aid on it and then solve the problem later too. “

– Paul Capuzzo, QU Democrat President

For 10-15% of Quinnipiac students whose parents took out Parent PLUS state loans, the average total debt after graduation is $ 78,439. the twelfth highest in the people.

As the chronicle reported In March, Quinnipiac’s freshmen tuition and fees increased 3% between the 2019-20 and 2020-21 academic years. In this academic year it increased further by 1.15%.

When the SGA members debated whether to accept the motion and support the letter, none of them mentioned the amount of debt the students are bearing. The debate centered on whether the letter represented the opinion of the entire student body.

Although the letter only required Ciampanelli’s signature, it also had to state how many students it represented. While the SGA encouraged students to come and share their posts, no one appeared to the open forum.

Caroline Mello, a senior senator, said at the SGA meeting on October 20 that she did not know how students would feel if the SGA accepted the request.

“I would personally sign this, but I have concerns that SGA will sign it as a whole because it is a very political statement,” Mello said.

Isabelle Strandson, a sophomore senator, said at the same meeting that she was “uncomfortable” with the language of the letter because SGA had not brought it to the student body at all.

“I don’t think it’s our job to vote on whether or not to support this statement without being able to pinpoint exactly what students think about it,” said Strandson.

Vice President for Diversity and Inclusion Jeremy Gustafson said at the SGA meeting on October 27th that the systematic problems will not end with a simple signing of the letter and will only benefit current, non-future students.

“IIt doesn’t solve the problem, ”said Gustafson. “Rather, it simply perpetuates these as summit topics with the student financing.”

SGA Vice President Chris Longchamp Sr. did not support the letter. He said passing the motion violated the training he had previously received as an economist at Quinnipiac.

“This doesn’t make very good economic sense going forward, considering we are only canceling student loan debt for the current college students,” Longchamp said. “Also, it’s pretty selfish of us to say that we want to cancel the debt for ourselves, but not for future generations.”

Chairman and economics professor Donn Johnson told The Chronicle that there are no wands that can simply make debt go away. Johnson asked what makes education different from other goods if people didn’t cancel their home or car debt.

“Canceling student debt is not free for the nation, someone is still paying,” Johnson said. “Taxpayers (pay) one way or another. And these loans are held disproportionately by families with middle and upper incomes. “

However, Assistant Professor of Political Science Marcos Sc Close said it was a good idea for the federal government to cancel the debts of current students for a number of reasons, including economic incentives, financial freedom for students after graduation, and fairness to the profits that come from the cost the student.

“We adopt huge corporations whenever there are crises because the money is supposed to be seeping away and they are supposed to be creating jobs, but we know that a disproportionate amount of money stays in the hands of the top 1% and never reaches the workers,” says Sc likewise called. “What if we used tax dollars to help an enormous number of people directly?”

Sc also said that if other countries can offer free education to everyone, so can the US. He said the US has spent billions on unsuccessful wars, which means there are more effective ways to adjust the country’s budget to prioritize people’s quality of life.

“This shows that we can think longer and have the resources to develop better policies,” said Scöß.

He has been forgiving since Biden became president in January $ 11.5 billion the end $ 1.75 trillion of student loan debt. Among the students whose debt was canceled included students with total or permanent disabilities and students who had qualified for the Borrower Defense Repayment Program.



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Pakistan in Snake Pit – Northlines https://austerlitz2005.com/pakistan-in-snake-pit-northlines/ https://austerlitz2005.com/pakistan-in-snake-pit-northlines/#respond Mon, 08 Nov 2021 18:01:16 +0000 https://austerlitz2005.com/pakistan-in-snake-pit-northlines/ Pakistan in snake pit On the occasion of the Defense and Martyrs Day of Pakistan on September 5, Army Chief General Qamar Javed Bajwa made statements such as: In 1965 Pakistan had defeated India – an enemy that was many times stronger; Pakistan’s key role in the peace effort in Afghanistan is evidence that India […]]]>
Pakistan in snake pit

On the occasion of the Defense and Martyrs Day of Pakistan on September 5, Army Chief General Qamar Javed Bajwa made statements such as: In 1965 Pakistan had defeated India – an enemy that was many times stronger; Pakistan’s key role in the peace effort in Afghanistan is evidence that India has, as always, taken an irresponsible stance; Kashmir is a recognized dispute and Pakistan will not accept a unilateral decision on this matter; Pakistan will win the fifth generation hybrid war.

It is recognized worldwide that the Pakistani army never waged a single war; Put aside the 1965 war with India. If anyone had asked him about the 1971 India-Pakistan War, Bajwa might have replied that Bangladesh was never a part of Pakistan and that the 93,000 Pakistani prisoners were imaginary because Pakistan had never participated in the world wars.

Pakistan’s monumental perverse contribution in Afghanistan to forcing America to surrender the country to the Taliban and a Taliban government that is also mostly made up of branded terrorists is well known. The illegal claim to Kashmir is, of course, the real reason the army continues to hold Pakistan in a stranglehold; more and more Crorepati generals are produced.

Bajwa’s joke that Pakistan won the fifth generation war, or the hybrid war, is intriguing. Pakistan has been waging a proxy war against India for three decades. So why this sudden outbreak? Certainly he had not foreseen the massive Tehreek-e-Labbaik Pakistan (TLP) protests that followed in October and forced the Pakistani establishment to negotiate peace. It was also difficult to decipher what was behind the usual walnut-like expression on Bajwa’s face. But now it turns out that Pakistan wallows in the snake pit itself, which explains Bajwa’s wayward statements; It’s the tail of the military that’s on fire.

The Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) and the Islamic State of Khorasan Province (ISKP) were both ideas of the Pakistani military ISI that are cracking down on the Pakistani establishment today. Initially, the TTP (then known as the Punjab Taliban) operated shoulder to shoulder with the Pakistani army in Afghanistan even before the US invaded Afghanistan. The ISI also used them to recruit cadres in the Badakhshan region in northern Afghanistan.

But TTP-ISI relations went awry when the Pakistani Army launched regular air and artillery strikes in North Waziristan and the FATA as part of counterinsurgency campaigns that claimed thousands of civilian casualties, including families of TTP cadres, during lakhs were evicted. Ultimately, the TTP responded with an attack on the army school in Peshawar in December 2014, killing 150, including around 134 students – wards of Pakistani military personnel. This has been criticized by the Afghan Taliban, perhaps because they were unable to get such revenge on the Americans and the Afghan security forces in Afghanistan.

In 2019, the U.S. Department of Defense had estimated 3,000-4,000 TTP cadres in Afghanistan. But in November 2020, the Amjad Farouqi group (faction of Lashkar-e-Jhangvi), the Musa ShaheedKarwan group, Mehsud factions of the TTP, Mohmand Taliban, Bajaur Taliban, Jamaat-ul-Ahrar and Hizb-ul-Ahrar joined forces all together with TTP. When the Taliban took over Afghanistan in September of this year, more than 2,000 TTP cadres were released from the prisons in Afghanistan along with some leaders – much to Pakistan’s chagrin.

The TTP has viciously targeted the Pakistani establishment. The TTP has not published its infographics for several months, but according to some estimates, in 2021 by October 30, the TTP killed between 250 and 280 Pakistani security forces and their supporters, the number of victims of the Pakistani security apparatus over the same period.

Pakistan has been desperately seeking a ceasefire with the TTP over the Afghan Taliban, but it has not worked. The ISI temporarily brokered a ceasefire with the Hafiz Gul Bahadur group (splinters of the TTP), but this was also broken. The TTP says it will only agree to a ceasefire if Pakistan approves its terms for the Pakistani government under Sharia law; otherwise, they will continue to attack the Pakistani establishment. Pro-TTP elements circulated the picture of the Pakistani Parliament building with the TTP flag hoisted on it.

Foreign fighters have begun to join the ranks of the TTP. Asadullah, a British fighter who is completing his training with TTP, says he came to Khorasan to fight the “Kuffar Pakistan armies” and America’s allies. “We know the people who have damaged the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan (IEA) the most. It was Pakistan that did the most damage. It was Pakistan that provided US airbases, intelligence and all sources of information, and most importantly, gave the Americans travel routes so that they could attack Afghanistan from Pakistan …… .. Your (Pakistan’s) Muslim brothers and sisters will be in your own country (Pakistan) suppressed in Waziristan and Balochistan and various provincial authorities. You are silent about them. “

The ISIS-K (also called ISIS-K) was configured by the ISI in Peshawar by mixing elements of the Afghan Taliban and the TTP (US intelligence referred to them as “angry” elements of both groups), mixed with Pakistani terrorist groups and pushed west into the Afghan province of Nangarhar. The Afghan security forces had named this unit the “ISI Brigade” instead of the ISKP Brigade. The US then began to abduct ISIS cadres via Pakistan to Afghanistan. The deadly ISIS-K operations in Afghanistan are currently targeting the Afghan Taliban and security forces – most recently the attack on the 400-bed Sardar Mohammad Daud Khan military hospital in Kabul on November 2, 2021, in which at least 25 people were killed and dozen injured .

A news channel quoted Nazifullah, an ISIS-K member, as saying, “Our first goal is to destroy Pakistan because the main reason for everything in Afghanistan is Pakistan. When the Taliban were here (even when the previous government was in power) they said we controlled 80 percent of the country, but they didn’t enforce Islamic rules. That’s why we got up in this area and started (ISIS-K). We want to implement Sharia law. We want to implement the way our prophet lived, how he was dressed, the hijab was there. We don’t have much to contend with at the moment. But if you give me something, I’ll fight Pakistan now. “

The problem with the Taliban is that they are fighting an invisible enemy in the IS-fight. Haibatullah Akhundzada, chief Taliban leader, has warned of intruders within the Taliban. One of the leaders of the Uyghur community in northern Afghanistan says that since the Taliban are demanding the eviction of ISIS-K from Afghanistan and China wants the Uyghurs to leave Afghanistan to find refuge in Afghanistan, it may prove unfortunate. On the other hand, ISIS-k can easily take advantage of this opportunity to recruit Uighur militants who the Islamists will see as their defenders.

Talat Masood makes three interesting observations in his November 3rd article in the Express Tribune: First, Pakistan is “drifting”; second, the increasing incidents of terrorist attacks in the former tribal belt, in which several young officers and soldiers have been killed, are not receiving the government’s due attention, and third; the consequences of the Taliban’s willingness to change could also affect Pakistan.

While Qamar Javed Bajwa talks about winning the fifth generation war, he knows that Pakistan has a bomb under his chair whose fuse is already smoldering and there is little he can do about it. Whether he is planning a military takeover of Pakistan or a rehabilitation through the chairmanship of the Islamic Military Counter-Terrorism Coalition (IMCTC) like one of his predecessors, or simply settling abroad while Pakistan is writhing in the snake pit remains a mystery.


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AI and deepfakes bring history to life – but at a high moral price https://austerlitz2005.com/ai-and-deepfakes-bring-history-to-life-but-at-a-high-moral-price/ https://austerlitz2005.com/ai-and-deepfakes-bring-history-to-life-but-at-a-high-moral-price/#respond Sat, 06 Nov 2021 18:00:00 +0000 https://austerlitz2005.com/ai-and-deepfakes-bring-history-to-life-but-at-a-high-moral-price/ To mark Israel Memorial Day in 2021, the Israel Defense Forces music ensembles partnered with a company specializing in synthetic video, also known as “deepfake” technology, to bring to life photos from the 1948 Israeli-Arab war. They produced a video in which young singers in period uniforms and with period weapons sang “Hareut”, an iconic […]]]>

To mark Israel Memorial Day in 2021, the Israel Defense Forces music ensembles partnered with a company specializing in synthetic video, also known as “deepfake” technology, to bring to life photos from the 1948 Israeli-Arab war.

They produced a video in which young singers in period uniforms and with period weapons sang “Hareut”, an iconic song in memory of soldiers who fell in battle. As they sing, the musicians stare at faded black and white photos they hold in their hands. The young soldiers in the old pictures blink and smile back thanks to artificial intelligence.

The result is scary. The past comes alive Harry Potter Style.

Over the past few years, my colleagues and I at UMass Boston’s Applied Ethics Center have been researching how everyday use of AI challenges the way people think about themselves and politics. We found that AI has the potential to weaken people’s ability to make normal judgments. We have also found that it undermines the role of chance in their lives and can lead them to question their knowledge or opinion about human rights.

Now, AI is making it easier than ever to revive the past. Will that change our understanding of history and, with it, ourselves?

Musicians disguised as soldiers connect with soldiers in old photos in a production of the Israel Defense Forces and the D-ID company in 2021.

Moral cost

The desire to bring the past back to life is not new. Reenactments of the civil war or the war of independence are the order of the day. In 2018, Peter Jackson restored and colored photographs from the First World War in order toYou shouldn’t get old“, A film that the audience of the 21.

Live re-enactments and carefully edited historical footage are expensive and time-consuming endeavors. Deepfake technology democratizes such efforts and provides an inexpensive and widely used tool to animate old photos or create compelling fake videos from scratch.

But as with all new technologies, along with the exciting possibilities, there are serious moral questions. And the questions get even trickier when these new tools are used to improve understanding of the past and revive historical episodes.

Eighteenth-century writer and statesman Edmund Burke believes that political identity is not just what people make of it. It is not just a product of our own manufacture. Rather, being part of a community means being part of a generation contract – part of a common company that connects the living, the dead and the future living.

If Burke is right to understand political affiliation in this way, deepfake technology offers an effective way to connect people with the past and forge that intergenerational contract. By bringing the past to life in a vivid and compelling way, technology enlivens the “dead” past, making it more alive and well. When these images inspire empathy and concern for the ancestors, deepfakes can make the past much more important.

But this ability comes with risks. An obvious danger is the creation of fake historical episodes. Imagined, mythologized and fake events can trigger wars: A historic defeat in the Kosovo battle from the 14th

Similarly, the second attack on American warships in the Gulf of Tonkin on August 4, 1964 was used to escalate American engagement in Vietnam. It later emerged that the attack never took place.

Atrophy of the imagination

It used to be difficult and expensive to stage fake events. No longer.

For example, imagine what strategically manipulated deepfake footage from the events of the 6th Effort was.

The result, of course, is that deepfakes can gradually destabilize the idea of ​​a historical “event”. Perhaps over time, as this technology evolves and becomes ubiquitous, people will automatically question whether what they see is real.

It is questionable whether this will lead to more political instability or – paradoxically to more stability due to the reluctance to act on the basis of possibly fabricated events.

But aside from the fears about the mass-production of the story, there are more subtle ramifications that worry me.

Yes, deepfakes let us experience the past more vividly and can thereby strengthen our commitment to history. But does this use of technology run the risk of stunting our imaginations – giving us prefabricated, limited images of the past that serve as standard associations for historical events? An effort of imagination can bring the horrors of World War II, the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, or the 1919 Paris Peace Conference into endless variations.

But will people keep using their imaginations this way? Or do deepfakes with their lifelike, moving representations become practical representatives of history? I fear that animated versions of the past might create the impression that the viewer knows exactly what happened – that the past is completely present to them – which then eliminates the need to learn more about the historical event.

People tend to think that technology makes life easier. What they fail to realize, however, is that their technological tools keep making toolmakers new – and worsening existing skills while opening up unimaginable and exciting opportunities.

With the advent of smartphones, photos could be easily put online. But it is also meant that some people no longer experience breathtaking views as they used to, because they are so fixated on capturing an “instagrammable” moment. Since the omnipresence of GPS, getting lost is no longer experienced in this way. Likewise, AI-generated deepfakes are not just tools that automatically improve our understanding of the past.

Still, this technology will soon revolutionize society’s connection with history, for better or for worse.

People have always been better at inventing things than thinking about what the things they invent do with them – “always more skillful with objects than with life,” as the poet WH Auden put it. This inability to envision the downside of technological advances is not fate. It is still possible to slow down and think about how best to experience the past.

Nir Eisikovits is Associate Professor of Philosophy and Director of the Center for Applied Ethics at the University of Massachusetts Boston.

This article first appeared on The Conversation.



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India calls for climate finance to be increased to $ 1 trillion https://austerlitz2005.com/india-calls-for-climate-finance-to-be-increased-to-1-trillion/ https://austerlitz2005.com/india-calls-for-climate-finance-to-be-increased-to-1-trillion/#respond Tue, 02 Nov 2021 23:55:00 +0000 https://austerlitz2005.com/india-calls-for-climate-finance-to-be-increased-to-1-trillion/ New Delhi [India]Nov 3 (ANI): Union Minister for Environment, Forests and Climate Change, Bhupender Yadav, on Tuesday called on like-minded developing countries (LMDC) to work closely together to protect the interests of developing countries and called for climate finance to cease The levels decided in 2009 should be raised to at least $ 1 trillion […]]]>

New Delhi [India]Nov 3 (ANI): Union Minister for Environment, Forests and Climate Change, Bhupender Yadav, on Tuesday called on like-minded developing countries (LMDC) to work closely together to protect the interests of developing countries and called for climate finance to cease The levels decided in 2009 should be raised to at least $ 1 trillion in order to achieve the goals of combating climate change.

In his speech at the LMDC ministerial meeting on the sidelines of COP 26 in Glasgow, Yadav underlined the unity and strength of the LMDC as fundamental to the negotiations on the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to safeguard the interests of the Global South in the fight against the Climate change.

Countries participating in the meeting included India, China, Cuba, Nicaragua and Venezuela.

Yadav stressed that recognizing the current challenges facing developing countries requires increased multilateral cooperation, not increased global economic and geopolitical competition and trade wars.

The Environment Minister also stressed that India, under the dynamic and visionary leadership of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, is working on ambitious climate action in line with sustainable development priorities.

He urged LMDC members to partner with India to support the global initiatives it has driven, including the International Solar Alliance (ISA), the Coalition for Disaster Resilient Infrastructure (CDRI) and the Leadership Group for Industry Transition (LeadIT).

The Minister also recognized the efforts of the Third World Network (TWN) to support LMDC and expressed the need to allocate resources to TWN.

Yadav urged LMDC countries to work closely together to protect the interests of developing countries, including the need to ensure a balanced outcome with equal treatment of all items on the agenda including funding, adaptation, market mechanisms, response measures and transfer delivery decisions to environmentally friendly technologies.

The countries jointly underlined the need to ensure that the voices of the LMDC countries are heard loud and clear. The results of COP 26 must respect the basic principles of the Convention, including justice and shared but differentiated responsibilities and skills (CBDR-RC). Developed countries must provide developing countries with options for implementing climate finance, technology transfer and capacity building.

They stressed the empty promises made by developed countries and the inability to deliver the $ 100 billion a year by 2020. They also called for the Paris rulebook to be completed quickly. (ANI)


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