Military Conflicts – Austerlitz 2005 http://austerlitz2005.com/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 12:13:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://austerlitz2005.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-7-150x150.png Military Conflicts – Austerlitz 2005 http://austerlitz2005.com/ 32 32 Emirates News Agency – Officers from over 20 countries meet to discuss protecting civilians in partner military operations https://austerlitz2005.com/emirates-news-agency-officers-from-over-20-countries-meet-to-discuss-protecting-civilians-in-partner-military-operations/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 09:45:00 +0000 https://austerlitz2005.com/emirates-news-agency-officers-from-over-20-countries-meet-to-discuss-protecting-civilians-in-partner-military-operations/ ABU DHABI, November 22, 2021 (WAM) – The Ministry of Defense, in cooperation with the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), held a workshop on Monday with a focus on Partnered Military Operations (PMO) with around 30 high-ranking military personnel from over 20 countries. The three-day workshop is intended to serve as a platform […]]]>

ABU DHABI, November 22, 2021 (WAM) – The Ministry of Defense, in cooperation with the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), held a workshop on Monday with a focus on Partnered Military Operations (PMO) with around 30 high-ranking military personnel from over 20 countries.

The three-day workshop is intended to serve as a platform for the exchange of knowledge between military practitioners, humanitarian and academic experts on measures to improve the protection of civilians and civil objects; in addition to restricting ordnance in military operations during armed conflict.

The PMO workshop takes place three years after the ICRC and the Ministry of Defense first hosted the Senior Workshop for International Rules in Military Operations (SWIRMO) in the region in 2018.

The workshop will look at the application of international humanitarian law to military operations while providing senior military officials with information about the ICRC’s mission, its role and its role in international conflicts.

The Department of Defense noted that in addition to the opportunities and challenges of promoting the partnership implementation of International Humanitarian Law (IHL), the PMO workshop will provide attendees with the tools and skills necessary to identify the lessons learned.

Brigadier General Salem Jumaa Al Kaabi, Head of the Defense Department’s Military Justice Executive, said: “The UAE’s humanitarian approach was initiated by the late Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, whose path was followed by His Highness President Sheikh Khalifa. Zayed Al Nahyan was completed, who created valuable framework conditions from which humanitarian ideas arose and based on the principles of protecting the civilian population, protecting the weak, helping those affected and helping all those in need without discrimination of religion or race , Gender, color, or political affiliation in armed conflict. ”

Al Kaabi added that the United Arab Emirates attach particular importance to international humanitarian law, a branch of international law. The country is one of the first countries to set up a national committee in support of international humanitarian law in 2004 and is home to the regional center for the Arab states to train Arab diplomats on the subject. It is also among the countries that have recognized the International Humanitarian Commission of Inquiry, as well as one of the few countries to have adopted the International Criminal Law, which follows the 1998 Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court.

“The UAE wanted to accede to most of the international conventions regulating issues of humanitarian law, and all of this is done within the framework of government support for the definition and dissemination of international humanitarian law. The UAE continues to seek to strengthen its relationship “with the ICRC through its mission to the United Arab Emirates,” he continued.

“We appreciate the great role played by the ICRC, which has set itself the task of disseminating and implementing the provisions of international humanitarian law,” said Al Kaabi.

For his part, Clare Dalton, ICRC Head of Mission in the United Arab Emirates, said: “The workshop provides a unique platform on which we seek to improve the protection of civilians in armed conflict. Host this important event that is consistent with our strategic relationship with the United Arab Emirates and our shared pursuit of global dialogue on major humanitarian and international humanitarian law issues. ”

The ICRC has launched a Global Armed Conflict Relationship Support (SRI) Initiative to work with the military and other stakeholders to identify practical measures to strengthen the protection of civilians. The ICRC works with a range of actors around the world to understand policies, practices and operational challenges relevant to relationship support, as it believes that armed actors can and should use their influence on one another to gain respect to promote international humanitarian law.


Source link

]]>
US warns Russia’s Wagner group against interference in Mali https://austerlitz2005.com/us-warns-russias-wagner-group-against-interference-in-mali/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 18:32:00 +0000 https://austerlitz2005.com/us-warns-russias-wagner-group-against-interference-in-mali/ US Secretary of State Antony Blinken warned the shady Russian mercenary group Wagner on Saturday against an engagement in Mali as he pushed for a civil transition in the troubled country. During a visit to Senegal, Blinken said the United States is “contributing to efforts with Mali and partners to support stability” in the war-ravaged […]]]>

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken warned the shady Russian mercenary group Wagner on Saturday against an engagement in Mali as he pushed for a civil transition in the troubled country.

During a visit to Senegal, Blinken said the United States is “contributing to efforts with Mali and partners to support stability” in the war-ravaged country.

“I just want to add that I find it particularly regrettable when external actors make things even more difficult and complicated, and I am thinking in particular of the Wagner group,” he said.

The private military force that western capitals see as closely linked to the Kremlin is linked to conflicts in Ukraine, Africa and the Middle East.

France has, according to its report with the military junta of Mali, sent 1,000 contractors to help in a long-standing conflict with jihadists, launched attacks against Wagner.

At the beginning of the month, the West African regional group ECOWAS imposed sanctions on individual members of the military junta that has ruled Mali since it came to power in August 2020.

Blinken said he had agreed with Senegalese leaders to keep Mali on its promise to transition to democracy and promised that the United States would offer benefits for such a move.

“As soon as the democratically elected government takes office, the international community is ready to support Mali,” said Blinken.


Source link

]]>
Library Announces Plans for Nutcracker StoryWalk Beginning December 3rd | News, sports, jobs https://austerlitz2005.com/library-announces-plans-for-nutcracker-storywalk-beginning-december-3rd-news-sports-jobs/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 06:25:22 +0000 https://austerlitz2005.com/library-announces-plans-for-nutcracker-storywalk-beginning-december-3rd-news-sports-jobs/ STEUBENVILLE – The Steubenville Public Library and Jefferson County’s Nutcracker StoryWalk will begin through the streets of downtown Steubenville on December 3rd. Pages from the book “The twelve days of Christmas” by Laurel Long is posted in downtown store windows for families to read together. Get a map at Leonardo’s Coffeehouse at 159 N. Fourth […]]]>

STEUBENVILLE – The Steubenville Public Library and Jefferson County’s Nutcracker StoryWalk will begin through the streets of downtown Steubenville on December 3rd.

Pages from the book “The twelve days of Christmas” by Laurel Long is posted in downtown store windows for families to read together. Get a map at Leonardo’s Coffeehouse at 159 N. Fourth St., Steubenville to follow them and find the hidden objects on each page.

“When you finish the StoryWalk, visit the main library so kids can pick up a free prize.” noted Jennifer Cesta, the library system’s public relations coordinator. “During a visit to the library, the children can also hang their Christmas wishes on a tree and do handicrafts to take away.”

The Nutcracker StoryWalk will be released until January 3rd.

Other programs and activities at the various library locations include:

Main Library, (740) 282-9782

Adults: The book club meets on December 1st at 10:30 am to discuss “This tender land” by William Kent Kruger. Call to participate.

Adena Branch, (740) 546-3782

Children: It’ll be a “Christmas tree, fork painting” Class on December 2nd at 5:30 p.m. Registration by phone in the library.

Brilliant Branch, (740) 598-4028

Children: Children can make a reindeer thumbprint ornament on December 3rd from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Registration by telephone is required.

Adults: The book club meets for discussion on November 29th at 6 p.m. Call for participation.

Schiappa branch, (740) 264-6166

Adults: The Rotating Book Club, where a different person moderates the discussion each month, meets on November 30th at 6 p.m. This month the group will discuss “The only good Indians” by Stephen Graham-Jones. Call to participate.

Children: Children 2-4 years old can enjoy stories, songs, and rhymes in the library during Dead Time. Tot Time is offered on Wednesdays at 11 a.m. on December 1st and 8th; Monday at 6pm on December 6th; and Tuesday at 10 a.m. or at 11 a.m. Dec. 7. Registration is not required. Come by for every meeting.

Tiltonsville Office, (740) 859-5163

Adults: The Thriller Book Club meets for discussion on November 30th at 6 p.m. Call for participation.

Children: Children can make a reindeer thumbprint ornament on December 3rd from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Registration by telephone is required.

Toronto Office, (740) 537-1262

Children: A story hour is available for parents and children aged 2-6 on Wednesdays, December 1st, 8th, 15th, 22nd and 29th at 4:00 p.m. Call to sign up.

Grab & Go Craft can be picked up on December 2nd while supplies last.

Grab & Go Story Time can be picked up on December 3rd while supplies last.

Tri-State Vintners Club

to have a Christmas party on December 3rd

STEUBENVILLE – The November meeting of the Tri-State Winemakers Club took place in the house of host Gino Guglielmo.

All members present “Had a wonderful evening under the great hospitality of Gino. The food and the wine exceeded all expectations. “ remarked Wendell Barner, club president.

The club is looking for opportunities for future wine tastings and tasting events at local wineries and encourages members to bring their wine friends to the meetings.

The monthly discussion on winemaking focused on how to calibrate or check a hydrometer for accuracy and how to compensate for inaccurate readings.

The club’s Christmas party takes place on December 10th at Giovanni’s Restaurant in Weirton.

Members should reply to Barner by December 3rd.

Regular meetings resume in January every second Tuesday of the month at 6:30 p.m. in the Hellenic Hall in the Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church, 300 S. Fourth St., Steubenville.

Anyone interested in learning more about the club’s events, membership, and other activities can contact Barner at barnerwl1@aol.com.

Amsterdam’s annual Christmas parade scheduled for December 11th

AMSTERDAM – Amsterdam’s annual Christmas Parade takes place on December 11th.

The line-up begins on Ridgewood Drive southbound at 6:00 p.m. and the parade begins at 7:00 p.m.

The parade heads south on State Route 43 (South Main Street) and ends on North Main Street and Steubenville Road SE.

Swimmers, tractors, ATVs, UTVs, horses, cars and trucks, walkers, fire brigade, EMS, police, tow trucks, etc. are allowed. Attendees are asked to respond by December 4, 2021, Chief Tyler Yoho or Mayor Jim Phillips.

Cookies with Santa, Mrs. Claus and the Grinch will follow in the Amsterdam Church of God on Bear Road SE.

Brooke County Museum is

available for arranged visits

WELLSBURG – The Brooke County Museum and Cultural Center is closed for the winter, but visits can be arranged at least a few days in advance by calling (304) 794-6584.

Located at 704 Charles Street, the museum houses a variety of exhibits that reflect the daily lives of Brooke County’s residents for more than 100 years and the military service of many in various military conflicts.

Get the latest news and more in your inbox


Source link

]]>
What would China’s counterinsurgency strategy look like? https://austerlitz2005.com/what-would-chinas-counterinsurgency-strategy-look-like/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 22:30:00 +0000 https://austerlitz2005.com/what-would-chinas-counterinsurgency-strategy-look-like/ From cybersecurity to maritime issues, America’s national security community has left no stone unturned in understanding the future of the conflict with China. Except for one problem: counterinsurgency. Some do believe Insurrection instead of conventional wars is the future of competition between the US and China. And other claim that lowering counterinsurgency priorities does not […]]]>

From cybersecurity to maritime issues, America’s national security community has left no stone unturned in understanding the future of the conflict with China. Except for one problem: counterinsurgency. Some do believe Insurrection instead of conventional wars is the future of competition between the US and China. And other claim that lowering counterinsurgency priorities does not mean that the United States can reject them altogether. If these beliefs are true, the United States must analyze how its competitor might fare on similar adventures.

“Counterinsurgency” appears only once on the Department of Defense’s 200-page page report on China’s military and security developments, published last year. And in a way, the lack of attention is understandable.

The first and most obvious is that China did not fight any War since 1979, and therefore there is no large-scale foreign military intervention to support their counterinsurgency strategies. However, the last war China waged was the 1979 Sino-Vietnamese War, in which 200,000 People’s Liberation Army (PLA) soldiers withdrew from Vietnam after encountering the same guerrilla tactics that the United States fled four years earlier was.

Second, if China has militarily intervened in non-war missions abroad, then only to a small extent. These ventures took place in places like Africa and Afghanistan, where the Chinese were involved in limited proxy conflicts with the Soviet Union. That reluctance comes from Chinese leaders as early as 1985 noticed that the primary threats do not come from high-intensity conflicts abroad, but in border areas such as Taiwan, Tibet and India. And even if they were to venture outside of these zones, during the Cold War the PLA was too ill-equipped to engage in long-range combat.

Thus, after World War II, Chinese military history lacks not only a foreign counterinsurgency movement, but also experience with large-scale conflicts as a whole. Given these limitations, what could give some insight into China’s counterinsurgency strategy? Three elements provide an answer: Mao Zedong’s experience with insurgents, Xi Jinping’s suppression of the Uyghurs, and the approaches of authoritarian governments to counterinsurgency in general. When viewed side by side, patterns of Chinese counterinsurgency doctrine take shape.

Clausewitz, but with a Maoist twist

To get started, it is imperative to understand Mao’s insurgency doctrine. Mao, the founding father of the Chinese Communist Party, derives from this teaching from Carl von Clausewitz, especially when it comes to aiming the focus of an opponent. “Insurrection can neither exist nor flourish,” Mao conditions, “when it separates from their sympathies and collaborations.” In his opinion, the political mobilization of the population allows insurgents to interfere, establish bases for operations and launch attacks with the help of the population. Here it is important to remember who was Mao’s enemy at the time: Japan during the Second Sino-Japanese War. Japan lacked the hard labor to occupy territory the size of China, but it lacked militant nationalism fueled his will to fight and to pursue other strategies not to give up the war entirely. Mao knew he had to avoid a crucial engagement that would have mobilized the entire Japanese people.

Following in Clausewitz’s footsteps, Mao postulated that the best way to beat the insurgent’s center of gravity would be the same as a military should beat any other center of gravity: by repeatedly hitting its core. Mao used both demoralization tactics and brutal violence to convince the enemy that fighting China would be such a devastating endeavor that surrender is the only way out.

These are not just theories: When Mao’s Red Army fought the anti-communists in Tibet, crucified, burned, or boiled living civilians who supported the rebels. For demoralization, Mao recommended soldiers carry leaflets extolling the virtues of communism when they meet anti-communist peasants to ensure the people never rebel.

Mao would love the oppression of the Uyghurs

In Xinjiang, Mao’s doctrine of brutal violence combined with propaganda has found its way into contemporary Chinese counterinsurgency. Alden Leader, editor at Georgetown International Affairs Journal, summarized it like this:

“The Chinese efforts to prevent an uprising in Xinjiang are authoritarian and brutal. […] The conditions in the camps are inhuman and prison-like, with people who endure torture and Die. These concentration camps are teeming with Brainwashing and indoctrination. ”

Instead of cooking insurgents, Beijing tortures prisoners, forcibly sterilizes women, and uses forced labor. In addition to handing out pro-communist brochures, it forces prisoners to praise Xi, greet the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), and renounce Islam.

These methods suggest that China’s suppression of the Uyghurs rooted in nationalism, as well as uprisings themselves. In its endeavors to unite separatists into a national image and to attain the status of a great power, China sinks identities that threaten the collapse of the nation. But it doesn’t work without the Chinese people. Through an online campaign portraying Uyghur separatists as terrorists, the CCP is trying to get popular supportT for increasingly repressive actions against the Uyghurs. If they fail to do so, not only is the state’s security at stake, but above all its rise to a great power.

China is likely to export these repression methods overseas, if ever it happens, because … they are effective. The CCP has followed the same strategy since the late 1950s to great success: The prospects of a Uighur uprising are slim, China controls its security interests in the region without fear of so-called “terrorist” threats, and separatist movements in Xinjiang have never gone beyond petty attacks here and there.

Authoritarian counterinsurgency

Finally, understanding Chinese counterinsurgency approaches requires an analysis of the bigger picture of authoritarian states in general. Since authoritarian powers are defined by pervasive intelligence and repressive abilities, a comparison of the Chinese counterinsurgency, for example, with the methods of the Soviet Union can shed light on which instruments it could use.

As for intelligence, authoritarian governments will certainly export their domestic capabilities overseas. she establish Intelligence dominance through the gathering of human information not through goodwill, but through extortion, torture, and various other tactics. In some cases, like Algeria, they even can infiltrate Rebellions masquerading as sympathizers and slaughtering villagers to create disgust among the people. Currently, China is exporting its intelligence capabilities through cyber espionage and sales from surveillance systems to other authoritarians. But in counterinsurgency campaigns, China can use these now mature instruments to stay one step ahead of insurgents.

About repression, authoritarians cut off Civil societies such as universities, professional associations, churches and, if necessary, even football clubs. Civil society is a primary source of coordination for rebels, which is why the Soviets forbidden the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church for its possible links with Ukrainian rebels. The elimination of civil society also fits the notion that the population is the “focus” of the insurgents because it blocks a source of recruitment and resistance and forces supporters to go underground instead of staying out in the open where insurgents are prefer to operate.

Last but not least, authoritarian Governments, like Joseph Stalin’s actions in the North Caucasus or Burma‘s response to the communist opposition to “turn the conflict zone into a closed system” by blocking trade or imposing curfews. The isolation of the area separates insurgents from supporters so that they cannot retreat to the mountains or other geographically advantageous areas. Aside from physically isolating rebels, the government can cut off access to food, funds, and intelligence information, most of which comes from civilians.

Taken together, Mao’s insurgency doctrine, dealing with Uyghur Muslims in Xinjiang, and authoritarian counterinsurgency approaches provide a theory of Chinese counterinsurgency strategies: that it will prioritize the brutal repression of the insurgent population through violence and propaganda, while using its military dominance to crack down on impenetrable ones Secret services and geographic isolation. With the PLA, China will seek to overwhelm its enemy with sufficient force to prevent non-combatants from joining the insurrection. Then it will rely on its intelligence skills to learn of rebellious movements before they occur, likely through the use of cyber espionage, signal intelligence and / or threats of violence. As a last resort, China can use ground forces to not only isolate insurgents from supporters but also to prevent insurgent foreign allies from providing supplies.

Will all of these strategies work?

Both the Tibet and Xinjiang examples refer to China, where China has a lot of political will and a lack of foreign interference. But in order to export these strategies successfully, it must adapt to the political environment and recognize that there are other centers of gravity than the supporters of the insurgents. It is also possible that these strategies work best when introduced gradually. Chinese leaders could choose to start a counterinsurgency with light manpower and propaganda and end with isolation and brutalization when the situation unravels.

Why China and America should care

For China, dealing with an uprising is approaching the non-theoretical. With investments in infrastructure, trade and military bases, combined with simply more Chinese citizens abroad, China is opening up to terrorist attacks. Right now, extremist groups are more preoccupied with attacking the United States, however Chinese efforts “Often local dynamics change and create new terrorism risks.” These changing dynamics take place in countries with a terrorist presence, like Nigeria where China is built a $ 1.5 billion railroad last year. Certainly China will not be blowing up weapons in Afghanistan or Iraq for the foreseeable future, as they have little incentive to do so, but an all-encompassing military policy should not ignore counterinsurgency.


Source link

]]>
Veterans Day, Memorial Day, Armed Forces Day: What’s the Difference? https://austerlitz2005.com/veterans-day-memorial-day-armed-forces-day-whats-the-difference/ https://austerlitz2005.com/veterans-day-memorial-day-armed-forces-day-whats-the-difference/#respond Thu, 11 Nov 2021 10:04:58 +0000 https://austerlitz2005.com/veterans-day-memorial-day-armed-forces-day-whats-the-difference/ Tomb of the Unknown Soldier: Before Veterans Day, the public lays flowers Members of the public lay flowers to commemorate the Tomb of the Centenary of Remembrance of the Unknown Soldier. EMPLOYEE VIDEO, USA TODAY Memorial Day. Armistice Day. Bundeswehr Day. Not to mention those we all know (or think we know) well, like Memorial […]]]>

play

Memorial Day. Armistice Day. Bundeswehr Day. Not to mention those we all know (or think we know) well, like Memorial Day and Veterans Day and Independence Day.

There are so many days devoted to remembering those who served in the military and in the wars over the years. It’s hard to keep them all straight.

So we’ve done a bit of digging, and here’s a handy guide for those who want to make sure they are honoring the right people at the right time of year and not making the dreaded social media faux pas.

This federal holiday is celebrated on November 11th each year and does not contain an apostrophe.

Veterans Day dates back to 1919 when President Woodrow Wilson commemorated the first anniversary of the armistice between the Allies of World War I and Germany, which began at 11 a.m. on the “eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month” of 1918 the US Dept. of Veterans Affairs.

The holiday, originally called Armistice Day, was recognized by the federal government in 1926 as “Day for World Peace”. In 1954, after the Korean War, the holiday became known as Veterans Day after an eight-year campaign to expand the holiday to honor all veterans, living and deceased, no matter how they died.

Discounts and freebies:

Veterans on the News:

Also known as Memorial Day, this is a public holiday that is also celebrated on November 11th, but in British Commonwealth Nations, such as UK, Canada, Australia and India.

While it is celebrated as Veterans Day in the United States, in practice it is celebrated more like our Memorial Day, when the fallen of World War I are honored with a few minutes of silence at 11 a.m.

Although not an American holiday, it is well known and often celebrated in the United States by expats from Commonwealth of Nations.

Remembrance Sunday is celebrated in the United Kingdom and Ireland, as well as some Commonwealth countries, and while the two sound similar, Remembrance Day and Remembrance Sunday serve different purposes.

Remembrance Sunday, which occurs on the second Sunday of November, is a time to honor British and Commonwealth military and community service members who participated in the world wars and subsequent conflicts, while Remembrance Day honors the fallen.

Originally known as Decoration Day, this holiday is used to mourn U.S. soldiers who have died performing their duties.

Decoration Day was celebrated after the Civil War until it was converted into a general memorial day in 1971, now known as Memorial Day.

This federal holiday is celebrated on the last Monday in May.

This is an unofficial holiday that is celebrated on different days around the world. In the US, it is celebrated on the third Saturday in May and falls towards the end of Armed Forces Week.

This holiday was first observed on May 20, 1950 to honor Americans currently serving in all branches of the military, according to a Ministry of Defense website dedicated to the day. It was intended to replace the separate days where each branch was honored individually, but most service members still honor their own branch as well.

This is probably the most famous of all holidays honoring American soldiers and / or wars in which the United States participated. Most people know that this federal holiday celebrates the date when the Continental Congress declared that England’s 13 American colonies no longer exist for King George III. subject and were henceforth a free nation.

What many people don’t know is that the image most commonly associated with this event – an oil painting by John Trumbull allegedly depicting the signing of the Declaration of Independence on July 4th, 1776 – actually didn’t happen.

According to Historic New England Society, Trumbull painted 47 men, five of whom did not sign the document, and 14 who signed the statement did not appear in the painting because he did not have a picture of them.

In fact, July 4th is the date the document was sent to the printer. The date depicted in the painting is actually June 28, when a draft of the document was ready for review but the document was never signed at a ceremony. In fact, the last signatory to the document, Thomas McKean of Delaware, did not sign until 1781, four years after the first official printed copy was published.

This is a day to commemorate the American flag. It is not a public holiday, but has been celebrated annually since the Flag Resolution of 1777 when the first official US flag was elected by the Second Continental Congress on June 14th. The day is still celebrated every June 14th, despite the fact that the flag itself has been changed 26 times.


Source link

]]>
https://austerlitz2005.com/veterans-day-memorial-day-armed-forces-day-whats-the-difference/feed/ 0
The world’s richest should pay to help the poorest – CBS17.com https://austerlitz2005.com/the-worlds-richest-should-pay-to-help-the-poorest-cbs17-com/ https://austerlitz2005.com/the-worlds-richest-should-pay-to-help-the-poorest-cbs17-com/#respond Tue, 09 Nov 2021 18:58:54 +0000 https://austerlitz2005.com/the-worlds-richest-should-pay-to-help-the-poorest-cbs17-com/ UNITED NATIONS (AP) – The Mexican president warned Tuesday that the world is slipping from “civilization to barbarism,” calling on the 1000 richest people, the 1000 largest private companies and the 20 largest economies to kill the 750 million people improve who are now living less than $ 2 a day. Andrés Manuel López Obrador […]]]>

UNITED NATIONS (AP) – The Mexican president warned Tuesday that the world is slipping from “civilization to barbarism,” calling on the 1000 richest people, the 1000 largest private companies and the 20 largest economies to kill the 750 million people improve who are now living less than $ 2 a day.

Andrés Manuel López Obrador told the UN Security Council that this proposal could raise around $ 1 billion annually to go directly to the world’s poorest people “without intermediaries, through a card or personalized electronic wallet”.

In a scathing speech before the most powerful body of the United Nations, the Mexican head of state sharply criticized the nations of the world for not dealing with corruption in all its forms – political, moral, economic, legal, tax and financial he called “the main problem of the planet”. “

López Obrador was only on his second trip abroad since taking office in December 2018 as Chairman of the Council, which Mexico serves for two years and which will hold the presidency this month. The country chose the theme of the meeting on Tuesday: “Maintaining International Peace and Security: Exclusion, Inequality and Conflict”.

As an example of exclusion and inequality, he cited the distribution of COVID-19 vaccines, of which 94% pharmaceutical companies sold and only 6% went to the UN World Health Organization’s COVAX program for distribution to poor countries.

“The spirit of cooperation is losing ground to the pursuit of profit, and that leads us from civilization to barbarism,” warned López Obrador. “We move forward, alienated, forget moral principles and turn our backs on the pain of humanity.”

“If we cannot reverse these trends through concrete action, we will not be able to solve any of the other problems affecting the peoples of the world,” he said.

López Obrador said Mexico will propose “a world plan for brotherhood and well-being” to the UN General Assembly in the coming days to guarantee the right to a decent life for 750 million people who are trying on less than $ 2 a day to exist.

He said the proposal could be funded with money from three sources: an annual voluntary contribution of 4% of the income of the world’s 1,000 richest people, a similar contribution from 4% of the 1,000 largest private companies by market value, and 0.2% of the GDP of the nations in the group of the 20 largest economies in the world.

López Obrador, while listening to UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, accused the United Nations of failing to help those at the bottom of the economic ladder, saying: “In the history of this organization nothing really significant has been done to help the poor.”

“But it’s never too late to see justice done,” he said. “It is time to take action against exclusion today, to deal with the causes and not just the consequences.”

Guterres, speaking to the council ahead of the Mexican president’s speech, said the COVID-19 pandemic had “exacerbated misery and inequalities” and pushed about 120 million more people into poverty, with millions around the world starving and starving and the world faced “the deepest global recession since World War II.”

“People in the richest countries are getting the third dose of the COVID-19 vaccine while only 5% of Africans are fully vaccinated,” he said. “Even before the pandemic, the world’s billionaires owned more than 60% of the world’s population – and that gap has widened enormously.”

The UN chief said the increasing inequality is a factor in increasing instability.

“Today we face the highest number of violent conflicts since 1945” and “a dangerous sense of impunity is spreading – as the recent violent seizures of power, including military coups, show,” he said.

“Human rights and the rule of law are under attack,” said Guterres. “From Afghanistan, where girls are once again denied training – and women their rightful place in society. To Myanmar, where minorities are targeted, brutalized and forced to flee. To Ethiopia, where a man-made humanitarian crisis unfolds before our eyes. “

The Secretary-General called for investing equally in the development of all people, for closer monitoring of growing inequalities to address grievances early on, including women in peace-building, and to ensure that national institutions represent all people. “That means judicial systems that apply equally to all people – not just the rich or those in power,” he said.


Source link

]]>
https://austerlitz2005.com/the-worlds-richest-should-pay-to-help-the-poorest-cbs17-com/feed/ 0
Non-partisan troops in surveys 2022: Army chief https://austerlitz2005.com/non-partisan-troops-in-surveys-2022-army-chief/ https://austerlitz2005.com/non-partisan-troops-in-surveys-2022-army-chief/#respond Mon, 08 Nov 2021 01:16:00 +0000 https://austerlitz2005.com/non-partisan-troops-in-surveys-2022-army-chief/ MANILA – The commander of the Philippine Army (PA), Lieutenant General Andres Centino, assured that all officers and men of the service will remain non-partisan in the elections next year. “We have always been a professional organization and we adhere to it. And I assume that in the coming elections we will again be appointed […]]]>

MANILA – The commander of the Philippine Army (PA), Lieutenant General Andres Centino, assured that all officers and men of the service will remain non-partisan in the elections next year.

“We have always been a professional organization and we adhere to it. And I assume that in the coming elections we will again be appointed together with the Philippine National Police as part of the main organization tapped by the Comelec (Commission for Elections).” he said in an interview with CNN Philippines over the weekend.

Previously, Defense Minister Delfin Lorenzana had reminded troops to remain neutral and impartial before the May 2022 elections, and military personnel are not allowed to campaign for a candidate.

The omnibus electoral code prohibits soldiers from participating in party political activities.

“The national and local elections are imminent. As we continue to conduct security operations, we must ensure that all employees exercise the right to vote. Everyone has to register for the upcoming elections, ”said Centino.

The army, he said, is determined to comply with the order of the Commander-in-Chief (President Rodrigo Duterte) to end local conflicts before the end of his term in 2022.

“We are making sure that all of our ground forces are able and ready to fulfill this mandate. Rest assured that the Philippine Army will continue to serve the people with pride and secure the country,” added Centino. (PNA)


Source link

]]>
https://austerlitz2005.com/non-partisan-troops-in-surveys-2022-army-chief/feed/ 0
Vermont By Degrees: Unvarnished Perspectives | perspective https://austerlitz2005.com/vermont-by-degrees-unvarnished-perspectives-perspective/ https://austerlitz2005.com/vermont-by-degrees-unvarnished-perspectives-perspective/#respond Sat, 06 Nov 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://austerlitz2005.com/vermont-by-degrees-unvarnished-perspectives-perspective/ Editor’s Note: Vermont By Degrees is a series of columns written by representatives from colleges and universities across the state on the challenges higher education is currently facing. When it comes to the relevance of higher education, the way forward for a college or university is to do what it does best. In the case […]]]>

Editor’s Note: Vermont By Degrees is a series of columns written by representatives from colleges and universities across the state on the challenges higher education is currently facing.

When it comes to the relevance of higher education, the way forward for a college or university is to do what it does best. In the case of Norwich, this is to train students in a mission-oriented curriculum based on serving others, providing students with practical skills such as nursing, engineering, cybersecurity, in addition to a solid foundation of liberal arts education that is not just for students teaches you how to act, but also how to think.

Last week, here at Norwich University, we hosted our annual Military Writers’ Symposium, inviting experts from across the country on evolving national security issues related to the Arctic.

This program is the quintessence of Norwich programming: it provides firsthand access to those working on society’s toughest problems, and we offer that access to the general public for free and share that knowledge with our community.

The Arctic is critical to regional stability. All Arctic states agree that peaceful cooperation is ideal; however, the possibility of future conflict is also a reality. Today, the Arctic occupies a central position in Chinese and Russian foreign policy. Russia is expanding its presence in the Arctic, and other Arctic nations are responding by expanding their footprint and capabilities in the Arctic. The focus of cooperation or conflict is competition for strategic resources, control of maritime traffic and geopolitical uncertainty. The Military Writers’ Symposium 2021 examined various dimensions of the Arctic with the aim of leading to cooperation and regional security.

To help us understand this complex issue, we invited Sam Alexander, an Alaskan native and a board member at Gwich’in Council International. He grew up in Fort Yukon, Alaska, where his father was the traditional chief of the Gwichyaa Gwich’in tribe in northern Alaska. He spent much of his childhood exploring the Yukon Flats and Northeastern Brooks Range, and lived the traditional gwich’in lifestyle. Alexander graduated from the US Military Academy and spent 10 years as an officer in the US Army before joining the Army Special Forces (Green Berets) as a major. After retiring from the Army, Alexander graduated from the Tuck School of Business in Dartmouth and co-founded Latitude Six-Six, of which he is also the CEO. He is a visiting lecturer at the University of Alaska Fairbanks in the Homeland Security and Emergency Management program. He brought a critical local perspective into the conversation.

We provided a science perspective with a presentation by Lilian Alessa, a professor and senior scientist at the U.S. Special Operations Command Joint Special Operations University. Her federal service spans decades, including serving as a high-level special advisor to the Defense Intelligence Service in the Office of the Director for National Intelligence Services and Deputy Head of Global Strategies at the Department of Homeland Security. She has nearly 30 years of experience in the Arctic with integrated systems security, defense and resilience in common, interagency, intergovernmental, multinational and commercial sectors in Canada and the United States.

There were critical maritime law expert James Kraska, chairman and Charles H. Stockton professor of international maritime law at the Stockton Center for International Law of the US Naval War College, as well as a visiting professor of law and John Harvey Gregory lecturer in World Organization at Harvard Law School. He was visiting professor of international law at the College of Law of the University of the Philippines and Gujarat National Law University, Mary Derrickson McCurdy Visiting Scholar at Duke University Marine Laboratory at Nicholas School of the Environment and Fellow at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Kraska is the editor-in-chief of International Law Studies, the oldest US journal for international law. As a former commander of the US Navy, he served with the emergency services and in the Pentagon, including as Oceans Law & Policy Advisor and then as Director of International Negotiations in the Joint Staff.

The speakers also included an expert from a Canadian perspective: P. Whitney Lackenbauer is Canada Research Chair (Tier 1) in the Study of the Canadian North and Professor at the School for the Study of Canada at Trent University in Ontario, Canada. He is the network leader for the North American and Arctic Defense and Security Network and was a volunteer lieutenant colonel in the 1st Canadian Ranger Patrol Group from 2014 to 2020. He has (co-) written or (co-) edited more than 50 books and more than 100 scientific articles and book chapters. His most recent books include “Breaking Through? Understanding Sovereignty and Security in the Circumpolar Arctic “(co-editor, 2021),” Canada and the Maritime Arctic: Boundaries, Shelves, and Waters “(co-author 2020),” Governing Complexity in the Arctic Region “(co-author 2019) and “Break the ice curtain? Russia, Canada, and Arctic Security in a Changing Circumpolar World ”(co-editor 2019).

We are in our third decade of offering the Norwich University Military Writers’ Symposium, the only program of its kind at an American university. We bring together authors and experts from the fields of military history, intelligence and current affairs to offer important perspectives on pressing global problems.

Last year’s program addressed the issue of water as a weapon, a critical issue that all leaders and committed citizens understand. Water and warfare have a long history, and the effects of today are both strategic and tactical. From the power struggle in the Arctic to the war for water in the Middle East to conflicts in Africa due to depleted water resources – the interface between environment and security is a topic that will shape the 21st century. Norwich wants to be a thought leader in this area. Norwich University’s Environmental Security Initiative, a joint venture between the Peace & War Center and the Center for Global Resilience and Security, examines the link between environmental issues linked to security concerns through research, internship, experimental learning, and programming.

As a Senior Military College, Norwich is dedicated to education that teaches students both building and defending the nation. Norwich University’s Military Writers’ Symposium will always offer unvarnished perspectives on the world’s toughest subjects. Please pay attention to next year’s program.

Daphne Larkin is Director of Media Relations & Community Affairs at Norwich University.

Vermont By Degrees is a series of weekly columns written by representatives from colleges and universities across the state on the challenges higher education is currently facing.

Vermont By Degrees is a series of weekly columns written by representatives from colleges and universities across the state on the challenges higher education is currently facing.


Source link

]]>
https://austerlitz2005.com/vermont-by-degrees-unvarnished-perspectives-perspective/feed/ 0
Military intervention in Africa cannot become a norm https://austerlitz2005.com/military-intervention-in-africa-cannot-become-a-norm/ https://austerlitz2005.com/military-intervention-in-africa-cannot-become-a-norm/#respond Wed, 03 Nov 2021 23:10:18 +0000 https://austerlitz2005.com/military-intervention-in-africa-cannot-become-a-norm/ This year alone, there were three military coups in which incumbent presidents, prime ministers and transitional governments in Africa were ousted. In Mali, Guinea and Sudan their governments fell under the institution to protect their countries. Military coups are not a new phenomenon, but accepting them as legitimate is. In these cases of arrest by […]]]>

This year alone, there were three military coups in which incumbent presidents, prime ministers and transitional governments in Africa were ousted. In Mali, Guinea and Sudan their governments fell under the institution to protect their countries. Military coups are not a new phenomenon, but accepting them as legitimate is. In these cases of arrest by the military state, coup plotters claim to intervene on behalf of the people of their country. Military officials who claim to be working on behalf of their citizens complicate the internal legitimacy and external responses of the international community.

Colonel Mamady Doumbouya, the newly appointed President of Guinea, relied on a quote from the Ghanaian leader John Jerry Rawlings when it comes to military intervention on behalf of the Guinean people. “When the people are crushed by their elites, it is up to the army to give the people their freedom.” This trend towards military coups does not bode well for regional institutions like the African Union, ECOWAS and IGAD, which are experiencing multiple conflicts at the same time.

Sudan is the latest example of a transitional government overthrown by the military before civil rule could take shape. Military officials arrested Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok and the leaders of the Sovereignty Council of Sudan on October 25th. Sudan’s Supreme General, Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, and former chairman of the Transitional Military Council who took office after Omar al-Bashir was overthrown in 2019, led this new coup derail Sudan’s transition to civilian rule.

In June, Prime Minister Hamdok warned against one complicated relationship between the military and the Sovereignty Council of Sudan. That instability warning came when Sudanese citizens protested Economic situation and a lack of accountability for a Massacre 2019 from the military in Khartoum. A Attempted coup was foiled by the military in September. This failed coup led to the arrest of over 40 officers and highlighted the growing instability in Sudan. Thousands attended weeks before the October coup pro-military rally and sit-in in Khartoum calling for a military takeover of the government. With several internal problems such as hyperinflation, fragmented factions and ongoing violence in Darfur, the Sudanese interim government could not maintain stability as it came under internal pressure.

Guinea’s military leader Colonel Mamady Doumbouya has appointed a prominent female genital mutilation (FGM) campaigner as foreign minister in his most recent move since taking power last month. https://t.co/jKIUhswq7k https://t.co/5arVlF4lqC

As in Sudan, the interim government fell in Mali when the military took over as the central authority. Colonel Assimi Goita, Mali’s current interim president, led the 2020 Malian coup d’état that led to the ousting of former president Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta. After the 2020 coup, the Mali military junta took over the interim government Bah Ndaw as President and Colonel Goïta as Vice-President.

In May the military imprisoned Ndaw as Goïta declared himself president. Goïta stated that the former President Ndaw and the civilian Prime Minister Moctar Ouane Cabinet position changes violated the transitional charter, forcing him to overthrow the transitional government. Days after the coup, thousands took to the streets of Bamako to protest their support for the military. Mali’s transition to a civilian government is now in jeopardy as the previously planned presidential elections may take place in February delayed from the military government. With Mali still suffering from a longstanding uprising in its northern region, France, a longstanding partner in the region, has begun withdraw his troops. Despite pressure from the African Union, ECOWAS, the United States and the European Union, Goïta and his government remain in power and steer the transition to civilian rule

In Guinea, the new military government did not come to power through the dismissal of a transitional government, but a democratically elected one. Former president Alpha Conde saw his term of office cut after Col. Mamady Doumbouya overthrew his government. Conde’s impeachment comes one year after the electoral commission made him the winner of the a controversial third term bid in office. Post-election violence in Guinea in 2020 resulted in security forces using excessive force against protesters; numerous people died during this period without a government or military official being held responsible. Conde faced many accusations Corruption and human rights violations faced imprisonment or death for those who dared to oppose the government for Conde cracking down on dissenting opinions. With power consolidating in one man and extreme repression, perhaps it was a matter of time before Conde’s regime fell. After the coup in September, Guineans did celebrated the removal of Alpha Conde while the security forces who orchestrated the coup were raised.

The United Nations, the European Union, and the United States quickly convicted the coup in Guinea. the African Union and ECOWAS both suspended and placed Guinea from their institutions Sanctions in the countryside. Despite international condemnation, President Mamady Doumbouya continues to run the country and build his government, and recently appoints former UN diplomats Mohamed Béavogui to the office of prime minister. The transition to civil rule in Guinea is fair Beginning, Guinea is likely to remain isolated while the African Union and ECOWAS develop a way of working with the military junta.

The most pressing question is why these military coups are taking place in the first place. The relationship between African citizens and the military has usually been stronger than the relationship between African citizens and their governments. Afro barometer Survey data show that citizens in Guinea, Mali and Sudan trust the military more than the president and members of parliament, in the case of Mali and Sudan by a very large margin. This trend correlates with the survey data from the Mo Ibrahim Foundation, which shows a high level of trust in the military in both Mali and Sudan. Guinea was the only one of the three countries that saw a decline in confidence in the military from 2010 to 2019.

Trust in the military is not necessarily a bad quality in a society; What is worrying is the level of military intervention we are seeing and the allegations of intervening on behalf of the citizens. Guinea, Mali and Sudan are prime examples of how rampant corruption, suppression of democratic norms and economic instability can lead to military coups, regardless of whether the government is in transition or not.

Seven successful coups took place on the African continent between 2010 and 2020, with six of the seven coups being led by the military. With three military coups in 2021 alone, greater regional stability should be paramount. The African Union, ECOWAS, the United Nations, the United States and other international partners are not allowed to give legitimacy to military coup leaders as this could lead to further attempts in different countries. The international community must put pressure on the leaders of the military coups and isolate their authority from global legitimacy. A more concerted international response means greater pressure on leaders to move to civilian rule and a concerted effort to get the military out of politics. With the interim governments in Sudan and Mali destroyed by military coups, it is now unclear how and when these two countries will relinquish their military government in favor of democratic rule. In Guinea, the slow process of reconciliation and the transition to civilian government is just beginning.

If you are interested in writing for International Policy Digest, please email us at Submissions@intpolicydigest.org



Source link

]]>
https://austerlitz2005.com/military-intervention-in-africa-cannot-become-a-norm/feed/ 0
Genesee County, to shed a (green) light on the challenges veterans of all military conflicts face https://austerlitz2005.com/genesee-county-to-shed-a-green-light-on-the-challenges-veterans-of-all-military-conflicts-face/ https://austerlitz2005.com/genesee-county-to-shed-a-green-light-on-the-challenges-veterans-of-all-military-conflicts-face/#respond Tue, 02 Nov 2021 13:29:21 +0000 https://austerlitz2005.com/genesee-county-to-shed-a-green-light-on-the-challenges-veterans-of-all-military-conflicts-face/ Press release: Ahead of the upcoming Veterans Day holiday, Genesee County announced that the Old County Courthouse at 7 Main Street will be illuminated in green from November 7-13 as part of Operation Green Light. This is a new joint initiative in support of veterans of all military conflicts, with a special focus on the […]]]>

Press release:

Ahead of the upcoming Veterans Day holiday, Genesee County announced that the Old County Courthouse at 7 Main Street will be illuminated in green from November 7-13 as part of Operation Green Light.

This is a new joint initiative in support of veterans of all military conflicts, with a special focus on the veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan, and to raise awareness of the challenges many veterans face and the resources that exist in the county, state and There are federal levels available in the country to aid veterans and their families.

The collaboration was developed by the NYS Association of Counties and the NYS County Veteran Service Officers’ Association.

“While the end of the war in Afghanistan has drawn Americans’ attention to the immense casualties of American soldiers and soldiers, it has also put considerable pressure on many of the veterans who served in this conflict,” said the Legislature Chair. Rochelle M. Stein. . “We wanted to do something special this year to reach out to our veterans and let them know that their service counts and we are grateful.”

In addition to lighting district buildings, residents are encouraged to participate by simply replacing a lightbulb in their home with a green lightbulb. This can be an outside light that neighbors and passers-by can see, or an inside light that stimulates a conversation with friends.

By giving the green light, we let veterans know that they are seen, valued, and supported. While this event focuses on the week of Veterans Day, November 7-13, attendees are encouraged to shine the light all year round.

With the hashtag #OperationGreenLight, residents can share their participation on social media.

“Operation Green Light is an opportunity to support our veterans and raise awareness of the challenges they face. “We encourage everyone to join forces with us to give our veterans the go-ahead and also to contact the vets in your life to come back and let them know that you are with them and that you have your back. “

For veteran information and resources, please contact:

Veterans Service Agency, Genesee County Building # 2, 3837 West Main Street Road, Batavia, NY 14020. Phone: 585-815-7905. Fax: 585-345-3085

E-mail: [email protected]. Website: https://www.co.genesee.ny.us/departments/veterans/index.php


Source link

]]>
https://austerlitz2005.com/genesee-county-to-shed-a-green-light-on-the-challenges-veterans-of-all-military-conflicts-face/feed/ 0