Major General Singlaub von Franklin Dies at 100, Mourned by Coalition to Salute America’s Heroes, others | Brentwood home page

Major General Jack Singlaub, US Army (retired), a highly decorated two-star general and founding member of the Central Intelligence Agency who was revered for his war heroism and vocal opposition to Communism, died January 29 at his home in Franklin , aged 100.

In retirement, General Singlaub also became a passionate supporter and advocate of the Coalition to Salute America’s Heroes (Coalition), a leading nonprofit organization dedicated to rebuilding the lives of critically wounded veterans of the Global War on Terror. From 2009 to 2013 he was a board member of the Coalition and its long-time Chief Ambassador.






John Singlaub.jpg

Major General Jack Singlaub


“One of the greatest honors of my life has been to know and work closely with Jack and to call him friend,” said David Walker, President and CEO of the Coalition. “It was completely in Jack’s nature to support an organization like the Coalition, which carries water for wounded veterans and their families. He was a patriotic, genuine American from foot to toe. We were blessed to have Jack on our team and I would like to believe he still supports us. Rest in peace, old warrior. You’ve earned your rest.”

According to one publication, General Singlaub was a larger-than-life character whose exploits during the war surpassed those of the much better-known warriors of his time. Over the course of three wars, he became known as the ultimate stealth commander with a knack for leading death-defying missions in mountains and jungles.

Towards the end of World War II, he pulled off a historic bluff that freed nearly 400 Allied POWs from a Japanese prison camp. After parachuting with eight men, he confronted the commander of the prisoner of war facility, claiming a rank above his actual captaincy and persuaded the commander to provide food and medicine for the prisoners until orders for formal surrender arrived.

General Singlaub also fought in Korea and Vietnam. In 1978, President Jimmy Carter famously clashed over the president’s plan to withdraw 32,000 US troops from Korea. Although Singlaub was relieved of his position as chief of staff for US forces in South Korea, Carter reversed his decision to withdraw troops. After retiring from the US Army, Singlaub was actively involved in anti-communist activities around the world, raising funds for freedom fighters and championing their cause.

In a message to Coalition staff, Walker said: “Our hearts are heavy as we announce the death of an extraordinary Coalition Ambassador — and an even more extraordinary American.” Major General Jack Singlaub, a great American hero, died Saturday surrounded by his lovely wife Joan and other family members.

“Jack’s friendship with Cathie and I meant the world to us and we were so blessed to know him, to call him friend and brother in Christ. We will miss him very much. Our prayers are with Joan and the rest of the Singlaub family during their bereavement.”

Since its inception in 2004, the Coalition to Salute America’s Heroes has provided an immediate, invaluable lifeline to thousands of America’s combat-wounded veterans.

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